Tag Archives: 2010

Julia Gillard’s carbon tax leads to massive defeat in Queensland election

Australia 2010 federal election results
Australia 2010 federal election results (Red = Labor Party)

I was disappointed with Queensland because of the last federal election in 2010. They elected several Labor Party MPs. And now the federal Labor Party is pushing for a carbon tax and gay marriage, too.

Look what happened in 2010:

Turnout 94.41% (CV) — Informal 3.56%
Party Votes % Swing Seats Change
Australian Labor Party 1,020,665 42.91 +8.13 15 +9
Liberal Party of Australia 818,438 34.40 –5.01 10 –7
National Party of Australia 239,504 10.07 +0.32 3 –1
Australian Greens 133,938 5.63 +0.57 0 0

The Liberal Party and the National Party are the two conservative parties – they form a conservative coalition, and they continued to lose seats, just like they did in 2007.

Given that, I was heartened by the results from this past weekend, when Queensland held state-level elections. (H/T Bill M.)

Excerpt:

[Opposition leader] Tony Abbott has sought to capitalise on the Queensland election saying Labor MPs right across the country will be worried about the “fundamental lesson” from yesterday’s landslide defeat.

Speaking on Sky News’s Australian Agenda the Opposition Leader said Labor needed to have a “good, long, hard look at itself” and said the party’s brand was “toxic” around Australia.

“This is a triumph for Campbell (Newman) and the LNP,” Mr Abbott said this morning of the Queensland result.

“I think Labor members of parliament right around Australia would be very worried about the fundamental lesson from this which is that a government which isn’t competent, which isn’t frugal and which isn’t truthful loses and loses big time.

“The basic message is that the Labor brand is toxic right around Australia.”

“Certainly there were two candidates for Queensland one of them Anna Bligh, who was for the carbon tax, and the other Campbell Newman who was against it,” Mr Abbott said.

Mr Newman’s Liberal National Party ended Labor’s 14-year reign in Queensland last night with a crushing win.

The latest forecasts have the LNP winning as many as 78 seats in the 89-seat parliament, with Labor expected to hold just seven seats of its former 51.

Mr Abbott said while the Queensland election had buoyed the Coalition’s hopes of winning the next federal election he conceded things could be different if Julia Gillard improves.

“If the federal Labor government is able to lift its game and be truthful, yes things could be different,” the Opposition Leader said.

“But I think federal Labor has clearly established its character.”

Mr Abbott stood by his comments last week that the Queensland election would be a referendum on the carbon tax and dishonest politicians.

Those results are now final – Labor went from 51 seats to 7 seats! This is as bad as what happened to the leftist Liberal Party in Canada in 2011.

Let’s hope that Julia Gillard, the head of the Australian Labor party, doesn’t learn anything from this and continues to push for left-wing fiscal and social policies. Tony Abbott is quite awesome in general, so they do have a good candidate running against her whenever the next election is held.

Is Dennis Kucinich or Pete Corrigan a better candidate?

This Cleveland Plain Dealer article explains the differences between Ohio candidates Dennis Kucinich and Peter Corrigan.

Excerpt:

Could the voters produce a Republican sweep thorough enough to whisk away Dennis Kucinich?

It’s hard to imagine. It’s harder yet to get one’s hopes up. But a very credible Republican candidate is running against Cleveland’s unrepresentative representative this year, and residents of the 10th Congressional District should be falling all over themselves to elect him.

His name is Peter J. Corrigan. He’s a businessman with expertise in the financial side of companies and — of all things — physics. In other words, he’s not stupid.

[…]A mere 17 years after Clevelanders banished him from office for sinking their city into default, Kucinich headed off to Congress. And there he has lingered — at least when not running for president — ever since.

[…]When he was first elected, the not entirely tongue-in-cheek assessment was that with 434 adults to supervise him in the House of Representatives, how much damage could Dennis do?

[…]Since arriving at the House 13 years ago, Kucinich has sponsored 104 bills — some of them containing some pretty wacky stuff.

Fortunately, only four have become law. Their effects:

  • The Ukrainian Museum and Archives has a copy of “Window on America,” a TV program the U.S. Information Agency beamed at Ukraine in 1998.
  • Revolutionary War hero Casimir Pulaski is now an honorary citizen of the United States.
  • A Cleveland post office has a new name.
  • Another Cleveland post office has a new name.

His bills to yank U.S. troops out of active war zones right this very minute, and impeach this, that and the other member of the George W. Bush administration didn’t make the cut. Embarrassed fellow Democrats hunched their shoulders, averted their eyes and voted down those crazy ideas.

[…]When he popped in to shake a few hands at a suburban Catholic church’s clambake a couple of weeks ago, one wag in attendance said he was tempted to grab a microphone and introduce “Congressman Dennis Kucinich, who used to be pro-life.”

[…]And then there’s that lonely battle Kucinich fought for single-payer health care, right up until President Barack Obama gave him a ride on Air Force One.

People who didn’t want to see the nation’s health care system wrecked by the federal government were praying that Kucinich would stick to his guns — relax, Congressman, it’s just a metaphor — and provide a crucial “no” vote on Obamacare.

People who bought years and years of his rhetoric about profiteering insurance companies just knew he’d show Obama and Speaker Nancy Pelosi how a person of real integrity behaves.

Instead, he caved. He voted for a bill he had vilified as an eternal guarantor of insurance company profits.

Read the whole thing and if you are in Ohio, vote for Pete Corrigan. Kucinich is the least sane person in Washington.

Would Ted Strickland or John Kasich be a better governor of Ohio?

Here’s a clip of Ted Strickland giving a speech to his Democrat supporters.

Here’s the transcript of Ted Strickland’s speech from the Weekly Standard.

Excerpt:

“The Republican party has been overtaken by the zealots, by the extremists, by the radicals … and they don’t seem to like Ohio very much… And quite frankly they act like they don’t like America very much. They want to change our Constitution. They want to change Medicare. They want to change labor rights. They want to change this country in fundamental ways.”

Does Ted Strickland encourage businesses to remain in Ohio and hire workers in Ohio?

Let’s see:

Wow. 400,000 jobs lost in Ohio while Strickland was governor? He sounds as competent at encouraging job creation as his fellow Democrat Barack Obama.

Ted Strickland raised taxes on citizens of Ohio by 840 million dollars. He thinks he knows how to spend your money better than you do.

Social Issues

I wonder how Ted Strickland is on social issues?

Life News says:

In June of last year, Strickland upset pro-life Ohio residents by using his line-item veto to axe the section of the $1.3 billion funding bill banning state funds for cloning human beings.

Mike Gonidakis, the director of Ohio Right to Life, told LifeNews.com at the time, “By vetoing a ban on using taxpayer funds for human cloning, Ted Strickland has demonstrated that he supports treating human life as a commodity.”

“Most Ohioans don’t share Governor Strickland’s cavalier disregard for the value of human life and they should not be forced to pay for its creation, exploitation and destruction in cloning research,” Gonidakis said.

In March 2007, Strickland feuded with pro-life advocates over his budget proposal that eliminated the $500,000 the state normally spends annually on encouraging kids to practice abstinence.

The governor said he would not apply for any more federal funds for abstinence education for future budgets.

In February 2007, Strickland would not fight to save an Ohio law that protects women from the dangerous RU 486 abortion drug which has killed seven women in the United States and injured more than a thousand more. With little fanfare, Strickland quietly dropped a legal effort to salvage a law that puts safety limits on the drug.

The Ohio state legislature previously approved a bill to bring the use of the abortion pill in Ohio in line with Food and Drug Administration guidelines.

During his tenure in Congress, Strickland had a strong pro-abortion voting record while Kasich compiled a strongly pro-life record.

Ohio Right to Life says:

Ohio Right to Life today announced its endorsement of a slate of pro-life candidates seeking elected office statewide. The pro-life organization picked Rob Portman as its endorsed candidate for the U.S. Senate and named John Kasich as its endorsed candidate for governor.

[…]Marshal Pitchford, the chairman of the Ohio Right to Life Society Board of Trustees said the pro-life movement in Ohio “is fortunate to have experienced and highly qualified pro-life candidates seeking the state’s executive offices.”

“John Kasich had an outstanding pro-life voting record during his career in Congress,” he said. “His running mate, Mary Taylor, is an articulate advocate of the right to life movement. As Governor and Lt. Governor, they will reflect the common sense and common decency of the people of Ohio.”

And he’s also lousy on traditional marriage and the rights of children to be raised by a mother and a father. He was opposed to the Constitutional Amendment banning same-sex marriage, and opposed to banning gay adoption in D.C. He’s a left-wing radical on social issues. Just like Barack Obama.

Right now, the Ohio governor race is a toss-up. I recommend that all my Ohio readers get out and vote for Kasich on election day.

 

n June of last year, Strickland upset pro-life Ohio residents by using his line-item veto to axe the section of the $1.3 billion funding bill banning state funds for cloning human beings.

Mike Gonidakis, the director of Ohio Right to Life, told LifeNews.com at the time, “By vetoing a ban on using taxpayer funds for human cloning, Ted Strickland has demonstrated that he supports treating human life as a commodity.”

“Most Ohioans don’t share Governor Strickland’s cavalier disregard for the value of human life and they should not be forced to pay for its creation, exploitation and destruction in cloning research,” Gonidakis said.

In March 2007, Strickland feuded with pro-life advocates over his budget proposal that eliminated the $500,000 the state normally spends annually on encouraging kids to practice abstinence.

The governor said he would not apply for any more federal funds for abstinence education for future budgets.

In February 2007, Strickland would not fight to save an Ohio law that protects women from the dangerous RU 486 abortion drug which has killed seven women in the United States and injured more than a thousand more. With little fanfare, Strickland quietly dropped a legal effort to salvage a law that puts safety limits on the drug.

The Ohio state legislature previously approved a bill to bring the use of the abortion pill in Ohio in line with Food and Drug Administration guidelines.

During his tenure in Congress, Strickland had a strong pro-abortion voting record while Kasich compiled a strongly pro-life record.

 

What is the most important issue for independent voters?

From the Weekly Standard.

Excerpt:

What’s the one issue that independent voters most strongly demand that a candidate get right?  According to a survey of 1,000 independents (and likely voters) recently conducted by Democratic pollster Douglas Schoen and commissioned by Independent Women’s Voice, the answer isn’t “national security,” “taxes,” “immigration,” “the size of government and its level of spending,” “putting a mosque near Ground Zero,” “the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan,” or “the stimulus and bailouts” — all of which were listed as options.  Rather, the answer is “health care reform.”

Nearly half (48 percent) of all independent voters said that even if a candidate otherwise held perfect views (in the eyes of the voter) — even if they “agreed with him on all other issues” (italics added) — they still couldn’t vote for him “if [they] disagreed with him on health care reform.”  (Another 13 percent weren’t sure whether they could abide such a costly error in judgment or not.)

And what must the candidate’s position on health-care reform be?  For 83 percent of the respondents who said their vote would hang in the balance, the candidate must oppose Obamacare.  So, according to the survey, if you support Obamacare, you’ve just lost 40 percent (83 percent of 48 percent) of the independent vote — before any other issue is even addressed.

Upon hearing this result, the 34 Democratic House members who voted against Obamacare must be breathing a sigh of relief that they’re not one of the 219 Democratic House members who voted for it.  (No Democratic senator can breathe a similar sigh.)  And they must be desperately hoping that their Republican opponents don’t force them to voice their position on repeal — for it’s hard to appear opposed to Obamacare when you don’t want to get rid of it.

This is only going to get worse as health insurance premiums go up.

Senate candidate indicted for showing obscene materials to teen

Story here from the Toronto Sun.

Excerpt:

Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Alvin Greene was indicted in South Carolina Friday on charges stemming from his arrest last year for allegedly showing pornography to a college student.A grand jury indicted Greene, 32, an unemployed Army veteran and campaign novice whose primary win in June stunned political observers, on a felony charge of disseminating, procuring or promoting obscenity and a misdemeanor charge of showing obscene materials to someone without consent.

The charges followed his arrest in November for an incident in which he allegedly displayed obscene or pornographic materials on a computer to a University of South Carolina student and then suggested going to her dormitory room.

Reached at his home in Manning, South Carolina, where he lives with his elderly father, Greene said: “My lawyer is dealing with that. That’s all I have to say.”

The maximum penalty for conviction on the felony charge is five years in prison, with the misdemeanor carrying a three-year maximum sentence, said the office for Greene’s attorney, Eleazer Carter.

Greene, whose long-shot candidacy has attracted intense media scrutiny, won South Carolina’s Democratic Senate primary after a campaign that included no budget, no staff and no verified public appearances.

He defeated former Charleston judge and state legislator Vic Rawl, who had the endorsement of the state Democratic Party. He will face Republican Senator Jim DeMint in the November election.

In several halting interviews with media, Greene has said his platform includes jobs, infrastructure and education and suggested South Carolina’s high unemployment rate could be lessened by manufacturing dolls and action figures of himself.

Greene gave his first public speech last month. He talked for less than 10 minutes and, in a monotone, third-person reference to his legal troubles, mentioned that his anticipated trial had been delayed.

Wow. This is the Democrat Senate candidate for South Carolina running against Jim Demint for a seat in the United States Senate?