Tag Archives: Coronavirus

Governor Cuomo opposes investigation of nursing home deaths in New York

Governor Andrew Cuomo is the least competent at handling COVID
Governor Andrew Cuomo is the least competent at handling COVID

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo likes to talk about how COVID deaths are all Trump’s fault, but his state has one of the worst per-capita death rates. And that’s largely a result of his own decision-making. He decided to send “recovered” COVID patients back into nursing homes, which resulted in thousands of additional deaths. So, is he taking responsibility? Does he want an investigation?

Here’s the story from Daily Caller:

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo dismissed suggestions Monday that local officials are undercounting coronavirus deaths at nursing homes while a several reports indicate the state inaccurately measured how the virus affected long-term care facilities.

New York will not conduct an investigation into nursing home deaths during the pandemic, Cuomo said during a press conference Monday. His insistence that there is no controversy comes after media reports show the state only counts people who died on nursing home property and not those who died after being transferred to hospitals.

[…]The virus has hit New York and New Jersey particularly hard. More than 32,000 people have died in New York from coronavirus, while New Jersey has a death toll of 15,785, data show. More than 6,000 of the fatalities in New York reportedly came from nursing homes, the New York Times media reported.

New York began omitting an unknown number of coronavirus deaths in May regarding how many people are dying in nursing homes, the Daily Caller News Foundation reported in May. The New York State Department of Health acknowledged the discrepancy in a statement to the DCNF that month.

Cuomo faced criticism in May for ordering long term facilities to accept patients from hospitals who tested positive for the virus. He rescinded the March 25 order in May after experts argued the move led to higher levels of death among nursing home residents, The Wall Street Journal reported.

This is the person lecturing Donald Trump on “mishandling” of the Wuhan Coronavirus. He’s literally the worst person at protecting his people, but he loves to point fingers at people who are not even in charge of a state.

Now, I know that Cuomo has no problem with infanticiding innocent babies after they are born. So if he has no problem murdering innocent people, then why think he has a problem murdering less innocent people? He doesn’t care. He’ll do anything to make Trump look bad in an election year. Besides, killing off the elderly reduces the “overpopulation” that Democrats are always so scared of. And it makes room in the hospitals for people who want abortions.

This article from the New York Post notes that Cuomo made other mistakes that raised the death count in his state:

Cuomo is praised even after he and the department of health spent years stripping New York City’s outer boroughs of sufficient hospital beds and equipment. There are five hospital beds for every 1,000 residents in Manhattan, but only 1.8 beds for every 1,000 Queens and Brooklyn residents. The result? When the pandemic struck, those hospitals were overwhelmed fast. The death rate for COVID-19 patients at Mount Sinai hospital in Manhattan was 17%. At Coney Island Hospital, 41% of COVID-19 patients didn’t make it.

Democrats have a lot to say about how terrible Republicans are at dealing with the virus. But red states did a lot better than blue states. The people who are responsible for protecting the public are the governors. New York and New Jersey have Democrat governors. Other poor-performing states – Connecticut, Rhode Island, Lousiana, Michigan, Illinois and Delaware – also have Democrat governors.

Hospitals built for Wuhan Coronavirus patients are being dismantled

It was probably a good idea for the U.S. government to construct massive hospitals to deal with all the expected Coronavirus patients. But now, these hospitals are being dismantled, and almost all of them never saw a single Wuhan Coronavirus patient. This story was reported by far-left National Public Radio, which is about as far left as you can go, except for North Korea.

NPR reports:

As hospitals were overrun by coronavirus patients in other parts of the world, the Army Corps of Engineers mobilized in the U.S., hiring private contractors to build emergency field hospitals around the country.

The endeavor cost more than $660 million, according to an NPR analysis of federal spending records.

But nearly four months into the pandemic, most of these facilities haven’t treated a single patient.

The Army Corps of Engineers has contracted with private companies to turn convention centers and other sites into emergency field hospitals. Federal spending totaled more than $660 million. Most of these facilities haven’t treated a single COVID-19 patient. Some haven’t opened. Others have closed but could reopen if there’s a resurgence in cases. This data on some of the biggest projects is current as of Monday.

Things are also going well for states that have re-opened early.

Florida has an excellent governor and it looks like he did the best job of balancing the need to lock down with the need for a quick re-opening to save his state’s economy.

The far-left Miami Herald reports:

Restaurants are seating patrons for the first time in weeks. Shops are cautiously welcoming back customers. And state parks are opening their gates.

As Florida looks to rebound from the crisis wrought by the novel coronavirus, so, too, does Gov. Ron DeSantis.

Florida’s Republican governor is slowly opening the state, a month after he shut it down amid national criticism for his response to the novel coronavirus outbreak that has so far killed at least 1,399 people in Florida and infected more than 36,000.

The move — at a date when early models incorrectly predicted Florida would experience a peak in infections — isn’t without risk. Florida continues to see sickness and death, particularly in hard-hit South Florida. But after avoiding worst-case predictions in March and April, DeSantis has, in May, positioned himself as a conservative coronavirus success story.

“DeSantis right now has been able to thread that needle between overreacting and following the facts,” said Rob Schmidt, a Republican Miami-based pollster with the firm McLaughlin & Associates.

And Georgia also re-opened early, but their Republican governor seems to have timed it right as well.

Far-left U.S. News and World Report has the story:

THE number of Georgia patients hospitalized due to the coronavirus has fallen to its lowest total in weeks, Gov. Brian Kemp said Saturday as the state’s death toll from COVID-19 reached at least 1,400.

Kemp tweeted Saturday morning that 1,203 patients were currently hospitalized, the lowest number since the state started reporting the figure on April 8.

He also noted that Saturday’s total of 897 ventilators in use across the state was the lowest number since early April.

“We will win this fight together!” the Republican governor tweeted.

Those states that re-open early will have much better economic growth than Democrat-run states like Michigan, New York, etc. that remain in lockdown mode. I sure hope that the blue states don’t come begging for money from red states after they kill their own economies. I’m in a red state, we’re open, and I don’t want my money being used for socialists who make decisions with their feelings rather than with facts.

 

Two new studies reduce the severity of the Wuhan Coronavirus

Let's take a closer look at an interesting problem
Let’s take a closer look at an interesting problem

I found two new studies that reduce the threat of the Chinese Covid-19 virus. The first one was reported by Sky News, and it’s about a study that says that coronavirus patients cannot contract the disease after they’ve had it once already. And the second study was reported by the Sydney Morning Herald, and it says that the virus cannot be transmitted from children to adults.

Sky News first:

A number of reported cases of coronavirus patients relapsing after overcoming the disease were actually due to testing failures, South Korean scientists say.

Researchers at the South Korean centre for disease control and prevention (CDC) now say it is impossible for the COVID-19 virus to reactivate in human bodies.

There have been more than 10,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in South Korea, with 245 deaths – a 2.3% fatality rate, which is lower than the 3.4% average as stated by the World Health Organisation.

A total of 277 patients in the country were believed to have fallen ill for a second time, as had patients in China and Japan.

This prompted concerns that the virus could be mutating so quickly that people were not necessarily immune to catching it again.

However, genetic analyses of the virus have not found any substantial changes which would effectively disguise it from the immune system.

So, this study is good news for people who have had the virus, but I still worry that people who have had it might be able to infect other people unless they are completely cured.

Then Sydney Morning Herald:

No child has been found to have passed coronavirus to an adult, a review of the evidence in partnership with the Royal College of Paediatrics has found.

Major studies into the impact of COVID-19 on young children suggest they “do not play a significant role” in spreading the virus and are less likely to become infected than adults.

While experts insist that more evidence is needed, they note there has not been a single case of a child under 10 transmitting the virus, even in contact tracing carried out by the World Health Organisation (WHO).

Public health officials in Switzerland have announced that under-10s can hug their grandparents again because they pose them no risk.

Now a review in partnership with the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) has found the evidence “consistently demonstrates reduced infection and infectivity of children in the transmission chain”.

Led by Dr Alasdair Munro, a clinical research fellow in paediatric infectious diseases, the research concluded: “COVID-19 appears to affect children less often, and with less severity, including frequent asymptomatic or subclinical infection. There is evidence of critical illness, but it is rare.

“The role of children in transmission is unclear, but it seems likely they do not play a significant role.”

This study just seems like all good news to me. It means that we can be more confident than we were before about re-opening schools.

Anyway, check out the articles and see what you think.

I’m an investor, and I mostly think that the virus is not an issue right now. My biggest concern right now is that we are doing damage to the economy by staying in lockdown. Damage that will really hurt us in the long run because of inflation and massive debt.

102 Americans died Monday while Democrats blocked Wuhan virus relief

United States Wuhan virus infections and deaths
United States Wuhan virus infections and deaths

While Nancy Pelosi was away, Republicans and Democrats co-operated to produce a bipartisan bill to provide relief to suffering Americans. But Nancy Pelosi returned and threw the bill out and instead demanded the relief legislation must contain socialist policies unrelated to relief. Meanwhile, people in America are getting sick and dying, and workers are losing their jobs.

The Daily Wire reports:

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) unloaded on Senate Democrats on Monday for continuing to play partisan games in trying to reach an agreement for a massive stimulus bill to provide relief to American families and the economy.

It had looked like the two sides were going to come to an agreement on Sunday to move the proposed $1.8 trillion stimulus bill along in the process until Democrat House Speaker Nancy Pelosi ruined talks.

“It was one party — the Democratic Party saying to this chamber and the American people, ‘Hell no. We won’t even take this up and discuss it,’” Cruz said on the Senate floor. “At a time of crisis, at a time when people are dying, that’s wrong. That’s shameful.”

He added, “When we awakened this morning following the Democrats’ obstruction, worldwide, there were 372,563 reported cases of the coronavirus. In the hours since then, just today, there have been an additional 23,352 cases reported today. While the Democrats are blocking the bill 23,000 new cases today.”

“In the United States, when we started this morning, there were 35,224 cases this morning. Right now, as of the latest numbers, there are 41,708 cases in the United States today,” Cruz continued. “That means we’ve had an additional 6,484 four cases today, while the Democrats are blockading.”

Cruz noted that Senate Democrats were not even in the chamber as he talked because they had all left.

“They’re not showing up for work,” Cruz said. “They’re not doing their job.”

“In the United States, as of this morning, there were 471 deaths reported due to coronavirus. As of right now it’s 573,” Cruz continued. “That means today 102 Americans died while the Democrats were blocking consideration of this bill.”

I was watching Dan Crenshaw tweet out screenshots of the Democrat proposals yesterday. It was astonishing: they wanted to include all sorts of things that have nothing to do with protecting Americans from the threat of the virus, and the economic damage caused by people being forced to stay home.

Here’s a list of their demands:

  1. Corporate pay statistics by race and race statistics for all corporate boards at companies receiving assistance.
  2. Bailing out all current debt of postal service
  3. Required early voting
  4. Required same day voter registration
  5. 10k bailout for student loans
  6. For companies accepting assistance, 1/3 of board members must be chosen by workers
  7. Provisions on official time for union collective bargaining
  8. Full offset of airline emissions by 2025
  9. Greenhouse gas statistics for individual flights
  10. Retirement plans for community newspaper employees
  11. $15 minimum wage at companies receiving assistance
  12. Permanent paid leave at companies receiving assistance

Those things have nothing to do with the coronavirus, or the declining stock market, or the mass unemployment caused by quarantining workers. Those things might be good, but they’re not related to the immediate problem of helping Americans impacted by the virus.

By the way, I’m not sure that everything in the spending bill is great, or that we should be spending so much money. But I do know that conservatives like Tom Cotton, Dan Crenshaw, Ted Cruz, etc. have been pushing the bill, and they worked hard on negotiating it.

What should we do about the Wuhan coronavirus?

The economic cost of making workers stay home
The economic cost of making workers stay home

I think by now most people have realized that there is an economic cost to shutting Americans of all ages into their homes. If people can’t work, then businesses can’t make money, and they have to furlough or lay off workers. We can’t keep up this policy of making everyone stay home forever – it would lead to another Great Depression. Is there a way to get people back to work?

This article from The Federalist explains, and comes up with a different solution. The author argues that the Wuhan virus is most dangerous to the elderly, and people with pre-existing conditions. And therefore they should shelter in place securely, while the rest of us who are under age 50 keep the economy from sliding into a depression by going back to work as soon as possible.

It says:

Richard Epstein at the Hoover Institution… points out that South Korean data, which is more complete than most other countries’ data, shows huge disparities in risks between old and unhealthy and young and healthy. “Clearly, the impact on elderly and immunocompromised individuals is severe, with nearly 90% of total deaths coming from individuals 60 and over. But these data do not call for shutting down all public and private facilities given the extraordinarily low rates of death in the population under 50,” Epstein writes.

[…]The costs Americans are being forced to bear may be more than is rational to impose. Already one-fifth of working Americans are being laid off and having work hours cut due to not even one week of suspensions.

“[T]he massive curtailments of the U.S. economy can have as many health consequences as the virus itself—if millions lose income and jobs, become depressed in self-isolation, increase smoking, and drug and alcohol use, and postpone out of fear necessary buying and visits to doctors and hospitals for chronic and serious medical conditions unrelated to the virus,” writes Victor Davis Hanson.

What if the real scenario is one of these: 1) We plunge the nation into a depression that kills many businesses and addicts millions to welfare, in a nation that has already pledged more welfare than it can afford for at least the next three generations. Because of this depression, many people die due to poverty, lack of medical care, and despair. Millions more transform from workers to takers, causing a faster implosion of our already mathematically impossible welfare state.

2) The nation quarantines only at-risk populations and those with symptoms, like South Korea has, and ensures targeted and temporary taxpayer support to those groups, goes nuts cranking out ventilators and other crisis equipment such as temporary hospitals using emergency response crews, while the rest of us keep calm, wash our hands, take extreme care with the at-risk groups, and carry on.

Why would the entire nation grind to a halt when the entire nation is not at a severe risk? I would rather have a flu I am 99.8 percent likely to survive than the nation plunged into chaos indefinitely because we pulled the plug on our economy during a stampede.

At the very least, Congress should wait a week or two, while half the nation or more is home, to see how the infection rates look as millions of test kits go out. The worst-case scenario they are predicating their actions on may not be the one we’re facing. Prudence suggests a measured, wait and see approach to policy until we have better information, not chucking trillions of my kids’ dollars out the window “just in case.”

Right now, I think we should expand testing so we understand the problem better, fast-track whatever drugs are known to work, expand hospital capacity, build more N95 masks, build more ventilators, and get people under 50 back to work. This is in addition to proper hand-washing, social distancing and working from home where possible.

The cost of a depression seems to me to be much higher than what is happening to South Korea right now. They have massive testing effort and they are only quarantining people who are at high risk or who show symptoms. That makes more sense to me than shutting the economy down, or pass massive spending bills with bailouts for businesses that should not be shut down more than a month.