Should we care that Democrats ran up the debt from 8.5 to 18.1 trillion?

In 2007, Democrats seized control of the House and Senate after winning the 2006 mid-term elections. The last Republican budget through 2007 had a 160 billion deficit. What followed next was years and years of trillion dollar deficits under Nancy Pelosi and Harry Reid. The Republicans only gained back the House in 2011, and the Senate in 2015.

Here’s what happened to the deficit while the Democrats had control of spending:

National Debt and Deficit 2007-2013
National Debt and Deficit 2007-2013

Now let’s take a look why this is a problem going forward, especially for young people. We’ll use this article from the Wall Street Journal.

It says:

The U.S. has come a long way since the days of trillion-dollar deficits, just a few years ago. The White House projects 2016 will have the smallest budget deficit in eight years. Yet the budgetary impact of the debt that’s been accumulated–$18 trillion in total, $13 trillion of that owed to the public–will reassert itself.

Currently, the government’s interest costs are around $200 billion a year, a sum that’s low due to the era of low interest rates. Forecasters at the White House and Congressional Budget Office believe interest rates will gradually rise, and when that happens, the interest costs of the U.S. government are set to soar, from just over $200 billion to nearly $800 billion a year by decade’s end.

By 2021, the government will be spending more on interest than on all national defense. according to White House forecasts. And one year later, interest costs will exceed nondefense discretionary spending–essentially every other domestic and international government program funded annually through congressional appropriations. (The largest part of the budget is, and will remain, the mandatory spending programs of Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid. Mandatory spending is over $2 trillion and is set to double to $4 trillion by 2025.)

The advice I would give to young people just entering college is to make sure that you don’t vote for more spending and borrowing. Because you’re the ones who are going to have to pay it off!!! Also, don’t waste your money on a discipline for which there are no jobs. Stay away from anything that is not STEM – science, technology, engineering, and math. Try not to borrow money. One lady I know just completed a couple of years of community college, before heading into a computer science program at a university. That is smart – I really recommend that.

Be willing to move if a good job presents itself, because earning money now before the storm is really important. Work while it’s day, in other words. Try not to stay in school any longer than you have to, because work experience is usually worth as much or more than school, and you get paid to work – you don’t get paid to go to school. Don’t think that things are going to be as good as thy are now, or that things are good enough to take unnecessary risks. This probably isn’t the time to “follow your heart” unless your heart is telling you to take the job that pays the most, regardless of how much you like it.

It’s very important to start saving as early as possible so that you can take advantage of interest rates when they go up to earn interest. The earlier you start to save, the more you earn in interest. The key is to never miss a chance to earn and save. Always keep working, and never go to school unless you really need to and you are sure that it will produce a return on investment. Your priority has to be working and saving, and not spending money on frivolous things like travel or thrills. We are not at the right time in history for concentrating on sky-diving, zip-lining and surfing. Now is the time for saving.

3 thoughts on “Should we care that Democrats ran up the debt from 8.5 to 18.1 trillion?”

  1. Hopefully the government will keep their hooks out of hard working American’s savings and retirement accounts. I’m afraid it will happen here, the same way it has in other countries. Nationalizing retirement accounts has already occurred in Hungary, Greece, Poland, and several South American countries. It would be foolish to imagine it couldn’t happen here.

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  2. Thank you for this post and the advice. My parents always taught me the same thing before I could even vote. We would discuss what various candidates and what they brought to the table before elections. I am grateful that my parents encouraged my love and interest in science and technology.
    You certainly have shared words of wisdom I hope many other people in the younger generations listen to.

    Like

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