Tag Archives: Savings Devaluation

Egan Jones cuts U.S. credit rating again, this time from AA to AA-

Story from CNBC.

Excerpt:

Ratings firm Egan-Jones cut its credit rating on the U.S. government to “AA-” from “AA,” citing its opinion that quantitative easing from the Federal Reserve would hurt the U.S. economy and the country’s credit quality.

The Fed on Thursday said it would pump $40 billion into the U.S. economy each month until it saw a sustained upturn in the weak jobs market.

In its downgrade, the firm said that issuing more currency and depressing interest rates through purchasing mortgage-backed securities does little to raise the U.S.’s real gross domestic product, but reduces the value of the dollar.

In turn, this increases the cost of commodities, which will pressure the profitability of businesses and increase the costs of consumers thereby reducing consumer purchasing power, the firm said.

In April, Egan-Jones cuts the U.S. credit rating to “AA” from “AA+” with a negative watch, citing a lack of progress in cutting the mounting federal debt.

Moody’s Investors Service currently rates the United States Aaa, Fitch rates the country AAA, and Standard & Poor’s rates the country AA-plus. All three of those ratings have a negative outlook.

Could this have anything to do with the decision to print $40 billion a month to “stimulate” the economy? Once you’ve given up on letting businesses create jobs by lowering their taxes and removing burdensome regulations, then printing money is all you have left. But no one mistakes that for economic growth, least of all credit rating agencies.

QE3: Obama ushers in hyperinflation with more “quantitative easing”

Investors Business Daily explains Obama’s latest desperate ploy to cover up his economic failures.

Excerpt:

The Federal Reserve announced a third round of quantitative easing Thursday afternoon, and it is big: A net $40 billion a month in additional purchases of mortgage-backed securities. And policymakers said additional accommodation will continue “for a considerable time after the economic recovery strengthens.”

[…]Ordinary Americans can expect to see higher gasoline prices. Quantitative easing also pushes up commodity prices — both by boosting demand for financial assets and by weakening the dollar.

Crude oil prices have been trending higher, and were up $1 to nearly $98 a barrel in mid-afternoon trade.

That will quickly filter down to gasoline prices at the pump. Gas prices moved back to $3.847 a gallon last week, the highest since April. They’ve risen for 10 straight weeks in part on anticipation that QE3 was coming. Gas prices could once again threaten the $4 level — it’s already well over that mark in California. And that’s with no major supply issues or feared disruptions around the world.

Higher oil and gas prices also could push food prices higher, by encouraging more corn burning to produce ethanol, as IBD’s Jed Graham recently noted. Corn prices are near record highs due to this summer’s historic drought.

The producer price index shot up 1.7% in August — the biggest jump in three years — on higher food and energy costs. Gasoline prices at the wholesale level exploded 13.6%. Food costs rose 0.9%, the most in nine months.

With job growth and wage gains so weak, higher food and gas prices will cut into consumers’ buying power on everything else. That will offset much of the modest QE3 benefits.

First and second round of quantitative easing:

Third round of quantitative easing:

It means they are going to print the money. There really is no difference between Barack Obama and Robert Mugabe when it comes to economic policy. The only thing stopping him is the Republican House and the conservative alternative media.